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The Best Guitalele Accessories for Your Instrument in 2021

If you’re looking for the best guitalele accessories to go with your instrument, you’ve come to the right post!

(And if you want to know more about the guitalele, check out my post that dives deep into the details about this instrument.)

I’ve played guitar since 2003 and guitalele since 2019.

In short, I know about musical instruments and what accessories you might want for your guitalele.

To be specific, I’ll go over the following guitalele accessories:

  1. Strap
  2. Picks
  3. Capos
  4. Amps
  5. Cases

Let’s get to it.

The Best Strap for Your Guitalele

This YouTuber reviews a hook strap in this video. Although I recommend a hook strap, I don’t recommend this particular hook strap. I just have this video here to illustrate how it works – that it hooks onto the sound hole of the instrument.

Because most guitaleles don’t have two strap buttons that most straps require, you’re faced with a few options.

  1. Get a luthier to drill a hole in your instrument and install another strap button.
  2. Use a strap that ties to the neck of the instrument.
  3. Use a strap that doesn’t require strap buttons.

Option one is more expensive and many people don’t want to drill into their instruments.

As for option two, I’ve used straps that tie to the neck and they can put unnecessary strain on the instrument.

They can also warp the tone of your instrument since they bend the neck slightly which in turn can bend the notes you are playing.

The best solution is option three in my opinion.

This option means getting a strap that clips or hooks onto the soundhole of your instrument.

You can see what I mean by clipping onto the soundhole in the YouTube video above.

However, that reviewer is talking about a single hook or clip strap that goes around the neck.

I prefer a double-hook strap that goes over the shoulder like this one.

This strap provides more support than the one in the video and shifts the weight of the instrument from your neck to your shoulder.

Guitalele Picks

Because a guitalele has both guitar and ukulele roots, you can use either guitar or ukulele picks to emphasize different aspects of the instrument.

For instance, standard plastic guitar picks will give your guitalele more of a classical guitar sound.

These firm picks will produce a lot of sound from your instrument.

That said, most guitaleles don’t have pick guards.

So be careful when you use plastic picks on a guitalele.

They could damage the instrument if you strum with a lot of force.

That said, you can certainly use a plastic pick on a guitalele without damaging the body of the instrument as long as you play with care.

However, because guitaleles and ukuleles don’t have pick guards, many opt for felt picks.

You can get a sense for the sound from a felt pick in the video above at the start of this section.

Felt picks protect your instrument from pick damage while giving your instrument a bit of different sound compared to finger picking or plastic picking.

I tend to prefer thin plastic picks for all my instruments including the guitalele.

But if you aren’t sure what gauge you like, you can always get a variety pack like this one.

And if you want felt picks, try these.

The Capo: One of the Most Important Guitalele Accessories

I use the capo almost constantly with the guitar.

And although I use it less on the guitalele, it still comes in handy!

In fact, I consider it one of the most important accessories for any musician with a stringed fretted instrument.

Keep in mind that many ukulele capos won’t be wide enough for a guitalele’s neck.

So I recommend a standard guitar capo for the guitalele.

This is the capo I use on many of my instruments including the guitalele.

Also, in the video above, I’m using a short-cut Kyser capo to imitate “DADGAD” tuning.

This goes to show that a standard guitar capo should work just fine on a guitalele.

That said, if you want to use a capo even more closely designed for the guitalele, you can try out this classical guitar capo.

In my opinion, there isn’t anything special about that “classical guitar” capo that makes it ideal for use with a classical guitar, or in this case, a guitalele.

However, some people prefer a classical guitar capo on a nylon string instrument.

So I thought I’d mention it.

Guitalele Amp

Here’s Jake Shimabukuro shredding on his ukulele and using an amp (and pedals) to do it. Of course, he’s playing on the ukulele, but the principle is the same for the guitalele. You can get a much wider variety of sound out of your instrument when you use an amp (and pedals)!

When you think of the guitalele, you probably don’t think of an amp as a an important accessory.

However, if you’re playing with others, an amp can help you be heard in the mix of other instruments that are usually louder.

For instance, if you want to jam with someone who plays the guitar, banjo, or piano, your guitalele can be easily drowned out by these typically louder instruments.

Plus, even if you’re playing solo, an amp is a useful accessory to have for the guitalele.

Why?

When you use an amp, you can get all sorts of sounds out of the guitalele besides just amplification.

For instance, you can use pedals to add distortion, reverb, or even loop what you’re playing.

In short, an amp can be the gateway to a whole new world of sound.

Guitalele Gig Bags

It’s hard to find gig bags or cases designed specifically for the guitalele because it’s not a super popular instrument.

However, there are still case options for this instrument.

Of course, the gig bag that works for your instrument depends on the guitalele you have.

If you have Yamaha’s flagship guitalele (one of the more popular guitaleles out there), know that your instrument is about 28 inches long (and plan your case accordingly).

If you own this instrument, it should fit quite nicely into the 28-29 inch version of this gig bag.

However, if you own a 30 inch long Caramel guitalele like I do, you’ll need the 30-31 inch version of that same gig bag.

Many Caramel guitaleles come with a gig bag.

However, the gig bag I’ve linked to above is more robust than the one that Caramel includes.

Guitalele Hard Cases

I don’t know of any hard shell cases made specifically for the guitalele.

However, you can find hard cases for the ukulele that will work for your guitalele.

This baritone ukulele case in particular seems like it would fit most guitaleles based on its dimensions.

However, double-check your instrument dimensions compared to this case.

This case may not provide the most snug fit, but it should work for the majority of guitaleles.

Guitalele Accessories Conclusion

I hope this post has helped you realize some of the accessories available to you if you own a guitalele.

These are the guitalele accessories that have been most helpful to me in my journey.

Let me know if you have any questions about them in the comments!

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