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Names for Guitars: What You Should Name Your Guitar (2022 Edition)

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If you’re wondering about names for guitars and whether you should name your guitar, this post is for you!

Should You Name Your Guitar?

Music is, above all, a very subjective experience for every listener and performer.

To many, it’s also a very emotional experience, a great way to evoke and express emotions.

So if there’s any way for a performer to feel more connected to the music they’re playing, then they should go for it.

And one way to feel more connected is to give your name to the instrument.

Now, I’m absolutely aware that a guitar is just an object.

After all, we need to be realistic.

But that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t give your instrument a name if you feel like it.

A little bit of personification can be a fun game of sorts.

I won’t be going too much into psychology, since I’m far from the expert on the matter.

But I know that having more connection to the instrument can enhance the experience of playing it.

And with an enhanced and more personal experience, the chances are that you’re going to play better.

So should you name your guitar?

If you feel like it, then absolutely go for it.

What Is the Best Guitar Name?

It’s impossible to say what’s the “best” guitar name.

As I already mentioned, music is a subjective experience, both for listeners and performers.

So the “best” name is the one that works the best for you and for the instrument you’re planning to name.

Since the whole point is to feel more connected to it, think of your guitar and what it reminds you of.

Or, even better, who it reminds you of.

Were you inspired to get this guitar because your favorite guitar player plays this same model?

Or did you perhaps get this instrument as a gift from someone?

It’s all up to you.

I know that this might not seem like a helpful piece of advice at the moment.

But you need to know what this instrument means to you.

How it feels, how it sounds, and how it looks goes into the equation.

To make things simpler, here’s a list of things that might help you come up with a name:

  • Name or a nickname of a musician who you feel connected to
  • Name or a nickname of a musician playing that particular guitar model
  • A name of a city, town, or a place you feel connected to
  • Names of your family members or cousins
  • The color, or colors, of the instrument in question
  • The age of your guitar, combined with some other traits, can also be a good idea
  • If you got your guitar as a gift from someone, you can consider that person’s name
  • A name that appears in a song that you like
  • A name of a person who inspires you
  • Fictional characters from books, films, or other media that interest you
  • Special tonewoods or materials used for the guitar
  • Numbered names, either in order of priority or so that you acquired your guitars

What Are Some Nicknames for a Guitar?

Any nickname that comes to mind is fair play.

Even a nonsensical combination of letters and characters if you really feel like it.

But there are some more or less “standard” ways to nickname a guitar.

The most common nickname of sorts is an “ax.”

Although more of a synonym, calling it “my ax” does feel like a nickname.

Some are also using “ax” as a shorter form, but that’s completely up to you.

You’ll also find terms like “six-string” for 6-string guitars.

I often like to refer to one’s guitar as a “weapon of choice” or call someone’s collection an “arsenal.”

What People Name Their Guitars?

If you’re wondering how people name their guitars, I’d suggest that you check out what the big names of the guitar world did.

For instance, B.B. King named one of his early instruments Lucille.

He later used the same name for most of his subsequent guitars.

There’s a whole story behind this name.

A fire broke out during his performance.

Two men fought over a woman named Lucille, knocking over a burning barrel used for heating.

Frankenstrat, or just Frankie, is a clever name given to Eddie Van Halen’s legendary Stratocaster.

This particular guitar was made out of parts of different discarded guitars, thus its name.

Albert King had a 1958 Gibson Flying V that he called Lucy, giving the same name to a series of other Flying Vs that he had.

The name was an homage to American actress Lucille Ball.

A few musicians also used numbers for some of their guitars.

For instance, Stevie Ray Vaughan had his Number One Strat.

He also refers to it as the “First Wife.”

Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page also has his Number One Gibson Les Paul, as well as Number Two and Number Three.

Tony Iommi has a custom SG built by John Diggins that he calls The Old Boy.

Then we have Keith Richards and his so-called Micawber Fender Telecaster.

I could go on with these names forever.

But in the end, the same point still stands.

Your guitar is your business and you’re the one giving it a name.

I’d always recommend giving it a meaningful name, something that would help you feel more emotionally connected to it.

Let your imagination run wild and name it whatever you want to.

Names for Guitars: Conclusion

I hope this article has helped you think through names for guitars and if you should name your ax!

And if you want to read more about the guitar on this blog, then check out:

Lastly, feel free to leave a message in the comments below if you have more questions about this or another guitar-related topic!

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